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Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

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  #76  
Old 07-19-2012, 11:21 AM
lagoonguy lagoonguy is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I've read and re-read all of FD;s books a number of times. I've read and enjoyed Zane Grey's writing along with Hemingway's and Jeff Shara is one of my modern favorites on the Civil War era. Therese gave me a Barns & Noble Nook tablet for my birthday and I just finished reading his Blaze of Glory last week while on vacation. I like his style of "historical novel" rather than pure history. Makes for much better reading, IMHO
BillH
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  #77  
Old 07-19-2012, 11:46 AM
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

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I've read and re-read all of FD;s books a number of times. I've read and enjoyed Zane Grey's writing along with Hemingway's and Jeff Shara is one of my modern favorites on the Civil War era. Therese gave me a Barns & Noble Nook tablet for my birthday and I just finished reading his Blaze of Glory last week while on vacation. I like his style of "historical novel" rather than pure history. Makes for much better reading, IMHO
BillH
Bill,

You will love that nook. Grab "In Search of Giants". Written by one of your fellows from Gloucester area --- in is "right in your wheelhouse". It has a strong enviro overture regarding what modern fishing is doing to the resource but, unlike some books with that tone, relates great and intimate fishing experiences.

Shaara is going to make a trilogy of that western Civil War series. I have everything he has written and frankly, his Civil War stuff may be his best but it is all great. Judging from his first novel, the one his dad started and he finished, Jeff learned a lot from his father --- and improved upon it.

Cheers,
Al
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  #78  
Old 07-19-2012, 02:12 PM
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I was (am) a fan of literature, and I was always more drawn to the deeper meanings - the imagery, symbolism, themes, etc. It wasn't all about the language for me and that is probably why I like Hemingway. For instance, I couldn't get through Ada or Ardor by Nabokov because the language was too intense. That guy was on another planet, making up words, etc, and...wait for it...the book was not written in his first language!

That being said it is the "Frank vernacular" that makes his books so good. It sounds like you are being read the story by a seasoned salt who has a way with words, and the style is all his own. (Wait, that's exactly what it is...) Stuff like "if you threw a 7" rebel you couldn't get it back" just reads so much nicer than "the bass were hitting 7" rebels."
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  #79  
Old 07-19-2012, 04:43 PM
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

Remember the twins greeting arriving weekend anglers:
"There is no fish here."
"not hitting."
"And what are they not hitting?"
"Webels."
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  #80  
Old 07-19-2012, 05:25 PM
JoeLyons JoeLyons is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

When Hemingway was in Paris, with the ex-pats, between the wars, he met F. Scott Fitzgerald at a salon patronized by Americans, that Gertrude Stein held weekly at her home.
At this time, Fitzgerald had just begun his ascent as a writer of some notoriety - this was still several years before he became a universal celebrity. Hemingway and Fitzgerald became fast friends. Their meeting pre-dates Fitzgerald's increasing alcoholism and his being known more as the husband of the original flapper, Zelda Fitzgerald, and as a wild party-goer. At this time, Fitzgerald was simply regarded as a brilliant young writer, whose star was rising.
Fitzgerald read some of Hemingway's work, and was impressed. He forwarded the pieces, short stories, mostly - to his publisher in New York with a note that he had met this young man and the recommendation that his publisher scoop him up before someone else did. Fitzgerald went on, in what was for him an uncharacteristic hard-sell, "I'm serious. This Hemingway is the real thing."
Hemingway, by contrast, was an insecure bully. Years later, when Zelda went into an asylum and Fitzgerald wrote "The Crack-Up," chronicling what they used to call a "nervous breakdown," Hemingway wrote a scathing piece about Fitzgerald and what a weak man he was. Fitzgerald would later remark, "Hemingway never missed a chance to kick a man who was down."
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  #81  
Old 07-19-2012, 05:40 PM
biggestsquid biggestsquid is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I think that Hemingway's deeply disturbed state of mind was always lurking very close to the surface. Although I enjoy most of his work it occurred to me more than once while reading that work --- he was under the influence of some powerful stuff. There is no doubt that he lived on the edge of society and it is not hard to picture him as a bully.

His fascination with death was born out in his last mortal act --- he was determined to be in control and likley felt very powerful when he stuck that 12 ga barrel in his mouth. I can't believe it was an act of despair --- rather pure arrogance.

Like most, I enjoy being transported by what I read and his ability to make you feel that you were part of an experience was unsurpassed. That is why he was an outstanding author.
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Old 07-19-2012, 06:49 PM
JoeLyons JoeLyons is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

From what I understand about his suicide, he had recently been to the doctor's and had been read a laundry list of everything he should not do any longer. It was all the things he enjoyed.
He was of the opinion if you can't enjoy life, why live it?

A very selfish act, particularly when you have children or a wife. It says that it is the things in life you enjoy, not the people. Suicide had run in his family before, and of course, since.
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  #83  
Old 07-20-2012, 08:07 AM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I don't remember where I got it but I always thought Hemingway had terminal desease. I guess that is a common reason for suicide.

OTS, my wife, Joyce, did her first college paper,English 101, as a freshmen on Hemingway.
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  #84  
Old 07-20-2012, 08:13 AM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

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What?! I can't believe you actually said that!
Listen, I read your book and thoroughly enjoyed it. It's a good read for someone who is interested in the sport. But don't get the idea that you're Hemmingway! And that last part of your comment is just insulting. Get a grip. You're just a guy with some skills like the rest of us "ashholes".
I don't have a problem with this broadside. He lauded the book, said it was a good read. I think it is bad form to refer to other surfmen as "ashholes." So in that respect he might be right. (He is also right that I ain't no Hemingway.)
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  #85  
Old 07-20-2012, 09:41 AM
lagoonguy lagoonguy is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

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Originally Posted by biggestsquid View Post
Bill, You will love that nook. Grab "In Search of Giants". Written by one of your fellows from Gloucester area --- in is "right in your wheelhouse". It has a strong enviro overture regarding what modern fishing is doing to the resource but, unlike some books with that tone, relates great and intimate fishing experiences.Al
Al,
I have the book "In Search of Giants" and I rate it right up there with the best tuna books I'v read.
BillH
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  #86  
Old 07-20-2012, 10:07 AM
Chris Garrity Chris Garrity is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I can't believe I missed this! Boy howdy, a kerfuffle in the Mister Smarty forum!

For what it's worth, Frank, I wouldn't take being told you're not Hemingway as an insult. During his time, he was considered the greatest, but his reputation has been sliding ever since. In fact, during his life, he was much more highly praised, and more highly remunerated, than his contemporary, F. Scott Fitzgerald; old Scott, in fact, died broke, and in relative obscurity, in 1940, when Hem was at the peak of his renown. But ever since, Hemingway's reputation has waned, while Fitzgerald's has waxed.

And Joe is right about the written word living on, and enduring. Good writing lasts, and there's nothing that anyone alive can do about it. Take my personal favorites from the early 20th Century: the hardboiled mystery writers, guys like James M. Cain, Dashiell Hammett, and Raymond Chandler (especially Chandler) were disparaged in their time as writers of unimportant, mass-market dreck, but today, they are taken very seriously, both here and abroad, as important, even great writers, and important social critics, whose work has enduring merit. I really believe that in 100 years The Big Sleep or The Maltese Falcon will be considered more important books than The Sun Also Rises or This Side of Paradise. But I digress.

So don't let one creep get you down. What you've written matters, and will matter a lot long after all of here are dead.
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  #87  
Old 07-20-2012, 10:24 AM
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Steve C. Sink Steve C. Sink is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

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Originally Posted by Frank Daignault View Post
I don't remember where I got it but I always thought Hemingway had terminal desease. I guess that is a common reason for suicide.

OTS, my wife, Joyce, did her first college paper,English 101, as a freshmen on Hemingway.
FRANK----I've got a thick book written by, I think, his last wife, with all that in it. It's been a while since I read it, and I trust it's account more than the internet-----Get back with you on that later today. Right now, Teresa's waving that damn pink dish-washin' apron at me.

MULE.
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  #88  
Old 07-20-2012, 06:11 PM
Mark C Mark C is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

I enjoyed the book. I think you were truly blessed to be able to get into the rhythm of fishing for seasons at a time. I think the selling of fish and the pressure that comes with it were a great part of the story.

I know that you’ve written about expecting to catch fish when you fish but how did you handle the fish droughts when they did come? Blame place, technique, fish harder? It can be hard for me to keep the faith after a few hours let alone a few days.

Mark C
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  #89  
Old 07-20-2012, 07:51 PM
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

Yes, we had fish droughts but I always knew they were part of fishing so nothing surprised me. One thing is we always had the Rhode Island option. I was not able to resort to that in Twenty Years because it would not have been loyal to the title.* That is one reason why I wrote Eastern Tides, to bring the two, Cape and Rhody, together. It was not just about fishing where the fish were. It was also where a buggy could be used as well. I had to have my family with me.

* = Nothing confounds an editor more than deviations from the basic central them of a book's direction. The editor rules; he is the boss. Cross him and you are alone without a place for your book.
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Old 07-20-2012, 08:22 PM
JoeLyons JoeLyons is offline
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Default Re: Book Talk: Twenty Years on the Cape

To avoid criticism: do nothing, say nothing, be nothing.
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