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Old 04-14-2004, 05:20 PM
the broken bobber the broken bobber is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: union county
Posts: 734
Default

In June 2003, the Pew Oceans Commission released its report to the
nation on the state of America's living oceans. The Commission
concluded that America's oceans are in crisis, with ocean-related
tourism and recreation threatened by pollution and sprawl.

In response, Governor McGreevey directed Commissioner Campbell to
consult with representatives of commercial and recreational fisheries,
community and environmental organizations, the business community, and
other constituencies and develop recommendations responding to the
report. The attached paper provides information on the proposed
recommendations.

The Department is asking for the public's thoughts on these proposed
measures and is also seeking the public's suggestions for how the
Department might better protect New Jersey's coastal areas and ocean
waters.

The Department will host two public meetings to gather input from
members of the public. The meetings are scheduled as follows:

Monday, April 19, 2004 at 10:30 am

Co-hosts: U.S. Senator Jon Corzine, U.S. Representative Frank LoBiondo
and DEP Commissioner Bradley Campbell

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Performing Arts Center, College Drive, Pomona, NJ

Monday, April 26, 2004 at 7:00 pm

Co-hosts: U.S. Representative Frank Pallone and DEP Commissioner
Bradley Campbell

Monmouth University
Wilson Auditorium, Norwood Avenue, West Long Branch, NJ

If you plan on attending, please RSVP to Anne Marie Hoagland at
609-633-2201.

Written comments may also be sent to:
Ruth Ehinger
Coastal Program Manager
NJ Department of Environmental Protection
P.O. Box 418
Trenton, NJ 08625-0418

The attachment follows:

Coastal and Ocean Initiatives for Public Comment
and Public Meetings


BACKGROUND/INTRODUCTION

Today's laws to protect New Jersey's coastal areas have developed
over many decades. Governor McGreevey is committed to building on these
laws to enhance our coastal and ocean resources and is looking for
public input on how we can best achieve this goal.

Initially, laws such as New Jersey's Waterfront Development Law were
geared toward commerce and navigation. The passage of the Wetlands Act
of 1970 afforded protection to tidal marshes. In 1972, a national
program to manage coastal areas was established with passage of the
Coastal Zone Management Act. The following year New Jersey's Coastal
Area Facility Review Act was enacted and broadened protection of coastal
area resources. New Jersey's coastal management program was
established in 1978.

Notwithstanding these efforts to protect our coastal areas, there is
growing national concern and accumulating evidence that the oceans are
at risk from nonpoint and point source pollution, climate change,
overfishing and the effects of coastal development.

This concern lead to the creation of the Pew Oceans Commission in 2000.
In June 2003, the Pew Oceans Commission released its report to the
nation on the state of America's living oceans. The Commission
concluded that America's oceans are in crisis, with ocean-related
tourism and recreation threatened by pollution and sprawl. The report
highlighted the adverse effects of coastal development and sprawl on
coastal habitats and water quality. The report identified the root
cause as a failure in both perspective and governance. Finally, the
report stressed the need to consider the complex interactions of marine
ecosystems, the need to maintain the diversity of those systems, and the
need to change our perspective by treating the oceans as a public trust
and protecting the integrity of the ocean ecosystem. In response,
Governor McGreevey directed Commissioner Campbell to consult with
representatives of commercial and recreational fisheries, community and
environmental organizations, the business community, and other
constituencies and develop recommendations responding to the report.

The Oceans Act of 2000 mandated the creation of the U.S. Commission on
Ocean Policy, authorized by Congress, and comprised of members appointed
by the President. The U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy is charged with
making findings and developing recommendations to the President and
Congress for a coordinated and comprehensive national ocean policy. The
new policy will address a broad range of issues, ranging from the
stewardship of marine resources and pollution prevention to enhancing
and supporting marine science, commerce and transportation. The
Commission's Preliminary Report will be released for review and
comment by the nation's governors and other interested stakeholders on
April 20, 2004.

In response to the Pew Oceans Commission report and in anticipation of
the report of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, the New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection has taken the opportunity to
consider actions that would strengthen stewardship of our coast and the
sustainability of our ocean. The measures being considered recognize
the ecological, economic, and recreational value of New Jersey's
marine and coastal resources, and are designed to further the goal of
healthy coastal and ocean ecosystems, as well as foster the public trust
regarding tidal waters administered by government for the benefit of all
citizens. The Department is asking for the public's thoughts on
these proposed measures and is also seeking the public's suggestions
for how the Department might better protect New Jersey's coastal areas
and ocean waters. Possible measures include changes to regulations,
development and implementation of plans to manage coastal and ocean
resources, funding sources for existing programs, or legislative
initiatives. In addition, the public input will help inform the
Governor's comments on the Ocean Commission's Preliminary Report.
The Governor's comments are due on May 21, 2004.

The Department will host two public meetings to gather input from
members of the public. The meetings are scheduled as follows:

Morning Meeting
Co-hosts: U.S. Senator Jon Corzine, U.S. Representative Frank LoBiondo
and DEP Commissioner Bradley Campbell
Monday, April 19, 2004 at 10:30 am
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Performing Arts Center
College Drive
Pomona, NJ

Evening Meeting
Co-hosts: U.S. Representative Frank Pallone and DEP Commissioner
Bradley Campbell
Monday, April 26, 2004 at 7:00 pm
Monmouth University
Wilson Auditorium
Norwood Avenue
West Long Branch, NJ

If you plan on attending, please RSVP to Anne Marie Hoagland at
609-633-2201.

Written comments may also be sent to:
Ruth Ehinger
Coastal Program Manager
NJ Department of Environmental Protection
P.O. Box 418
Trenton, NJ 08625-0418
OPTIONS FOR
COASTAL AND OCEAN PROTECTIONS

COASTAL HABITAT
Incorporate biodiversity considerations into long-term shore protection
planning, including protection, enhancement, and creation of habitat for
beach nesting birds, migratory shorebirds, horseshoe crabs, and
long-legged wading birds.

Establish new Coastal Sanctuaries Program to provide interconnected
areas of protected coastal habitat, coastal open space and natural areas
for public recreation and conservation, beginning with the Delaware Bay
and the waters and wetlands associated with Hereford Inlet and Great
Bay. Increase Green Acres Program (State Land Acquisition) funding
priority for the acquisition of lands that serve to create new, or
enhance existing Coastal Sanctuary areas.

Design and strengthen protection of high value coastal aquatic habitat
areas that are used by marine finfish and shellfish populations as
spawning and nursery areas. Special management options could then be
developed for these areas once clear objectives are identified and a
program is established to measure accomplishments, with appropriate
public and user group input.
Expand brownfield reimbursements to brownfield redevelopment that
includes a habitat restoration component.

Establish a long- term monitoring program for the horseshoe crab
population as a key species of the Delaware Bay ecosystem.

Address the role of fishing gear interactions and bycatch in population
declines of marine birds, turtles and mammals and to develop solutions
that minimize any negative impact on the commercial fishing industry.

Increase Green Acres Program funding to municipalities, counties, and
nonprofit land conservancies for the development of facilities that
promote wildlife viewing and other ecotourism opportunities. Facilities
might include boardwalks, platforms, bird blinds, canoe/kayak launch
areas, signage, etc.

COASTAL WATER QUALITY

Establish a challenge grant program to accelerate coastal stormwater
management and combined sewer overflow (CSO) compliance measures.
Implement measures to improve the quality of water discharged to the
ocean from Wreck Pond to reduce related beach closures. These measures
could include dredging the pond and its immediate tributaries,
installing stormwater controls for discharges to the pond to reduce
sediment and bacterial loadings, restoring habitat, and extending the
ocean outfall pipe. Develop a systematic approach for restoring and
managing additional coastal lakes that discharge into the Atlantic Ocean
and prioritize implementation based on severity of impairment to
recreational use.

In cooperation with the Office of Maritime Resources, develop regional
plans for dredged material management in the Raritan and Sandy Hook Bays
and the Atlantic coastal basin, with an emphasis on beneficial use.

Accommodate navigational dredging needs at private marinas and
federal/state navigational channels, with the goal of identifying
capacity to accept 500,000 cubic yards of dredged material by 2006.

Support the federal proposal for development of a coastal ocean
observing system to provide coordinated collection and analysis of
remote sensing data, automated sensor data and routine monitoring data
for more effective measurement of the health of New Jersey's ocean
waters.

Expand real-time water quality monitoring into Barnegat Bay in
cooperation with the New Jersey Water Monitoring Coordinating Council
Implement a Clean Marina Program that encourages marinas to adopt
voluntary measures to reduce marina-related pollution and contribute to
improving water quality.

Identify sanitary systems likely to fail and require remedial action to
prevent release of untreated sewage into coastal waters. The
determination would first focus on the systems of the City of Long
Branch, Ocean Township, and systems in the coverage areas of South
Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authorities, and Two Rivers Water Reclamation
Authority.

Reduce non-point source pollution to coastal waters by implementing the
new Municipal Storm Water Program. Governor McGreevey has already made
available $6 million in grants to assist compliance with the new
program, and has proposed an additional $6 million for this purpose in
the upcoming fiscal year. The State is also working towards making $30
million in challenge grants available for projects that are necessary to
achieve compliance with the new stormwater requirements.

Reduce the use of polluting materials, such as treated woods, in the
construction of docks and bulkheads in coastal waterways.

COASTAL DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC ACCESS

Revise the Coastal Zone Management and Water Quality Management rules
to concentrate development and reduce sprawl development in coastal
areas.

In conjunction with the Board of Public Utilities, develop standards
for offshore energy infrastructure, including wind turbines, which may
impact aspects of the marine and coastal environment, including avian
species, scenic resources, and public uses.

Strengthen New Jersey's role in managing development and use of the
ocean in federal waters and New Jersey's ability to review federal
projects and federally permitted projects such as submerged cables and
offshore wind turbines that may affect the State's coastal areas.
Review additional federal actions, including activities in interstate
waters such as the Hudson River and Delaware River and Bay, to ensure
that the state's coastal resources and uses are not adversely
affected.

Expand public's access to New Jersey's coastal waters for active
and passive recreation.

MARINE FISHERIES AND SHELLFISHERIES

Investigate the cause of the decline in surf clam stocks during the
past three years off the New Jersey coast.

Reduce the construction of new docks in shellfish waters.

Protect additional sensitive shellfish beds by classifying certain
surface water bodies as Category 1 waters, beginning with the
exceptional shellfish waters of the Great Egg Harbor River, Great Egg
Harbor Bay, and Maurice River.
Identify and address nonpoint sources of water pollution that adversely
affect shellfish resources and threaten public health through
consumption of contaminated shellfish, beginning with Sandy Hook Bay and
the Navesink River.

Enhance an additional 500 acres of oyster resources for their
ecological and economic benefits and work to secure federal funds to
expand efforts to rehabilitate the oyster resources within the Delaware
Estuary.

Initiate and assist in community-based hard clam and oyster restoration
projects in Atlantic Coast estuaries at locations where these resources
have declined. Drawing upon the Shellfish Habitat Mitigation Fund
monies designated for this purpose, the Department has a goal of
restoring 50-100 acres of hard clam and oyster habitat this year.

Institute licensing for commercial landings of fish to provide
dedicated funding for enforcement and systematic implementation of a
comprehensive system for collecting and trading of landing statistics.

Designate locations for environmentally sound aquaculture, with
consideration of the competing interests of various user groups. Develop
policies to facilitate expansion of shellfish aquaculture in New Jersey.
The Department anticipates the sampling and identification of 1000
acres of potential aquaculture locations in FY '05 to add to the
600-700 acres identified in FY '04.

Strengthen protection of fish and shellfish resources and maintenance
of commercial and recreational fishing, using updated mapping of ocean
waters that support significant recreational or commercial fishing.

Accelerate monitoring of toxic pollutants in crustaceans and fish
tissue, make the resulting data available to the public, and provide a
public process for analyzing the data.

Provide fish consumption advisories for shared waters that are
consistent between New Jersey and New York, and between New Jersey and
Pennsylvania. This effort will build on the success in issuing
consistent fish consumption advisories, in New Jersey and Delaware, for
the shared waters of the Delaware estuary, including the Delaware River
downstream of the Pennsylvania border and Delaware Bay. The benefits
for establishing consistent advisories in New Jersey's shared waters
include a more effective and concise public message, coordinated state
outreach efforts, increased public comprehension, and most importantly
increased protection of public health from the bioaccumulative
contaminants found in elevated levels in some local fish species.

SHARING OF COASTAL DATA

Create a publicly accessible database for sediment analysis information
generated from dredging projects in conjunction with efforts currently
being implemented by the Office of Maritime Resources, New Jersey
Department of Transportation.

Expand the Department's real-time water quality monitoring network to
provide greater coverage of the State's coastal waters to the public
through Internet access.

Provide information on public access locations to beaches and tidal
waters and associated amenities throughout the coastal area.

STATE LEGISLATION

Prohibit offshore energy exploration and development of offshore energy
facilities that would have an adverse affect on fish or marine life or
water quality.

Expand the jurisdiction of the Coastal Area Facility Review Act in
particularly sensitive areas.

Authorize the Environmental Infrastructure Trust to make loans
available prior to the end of a funding cycle for urgent or emergency
repairs needed to prevent sewer line failures.

Revise the shellfish statutes (Title 50) to allow aquaculture leases
for areas along the Delaware bayshore in the vicinity of Pierce's Point,
in response to changes in both the status of natural oyster beds in this
area and in fishery practices and to enhance the Department's efforts to
foster environmentally-sound aquaculture in New Jersey.

FEDERAL LEGISLATION

Reauthorize the Coastal Zone Management Act and strengthen states role
in coastal zone management.

Increase funding to the state coastal management programs, for
developing regional and ecosystem-based coastal and ocean resource
management policies, implementation of Stormwater Phase II, for combined
sewer overflow remediation.

Provide sustained, dedicated funding to the Coastal and Estuarine Land
Conservation Program and enable states to work in partnership with local
government and nongovernmental partners in land conservation.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-14-2004, 05:20 PM
the broken bobber the broken bobber is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: union county
Posts: 734
Default

In June 2003, the Pew Oceans Commission released its report to the
nation on the state of America's living oceans. The Commission
concluded that America's oceans are in crisis, with ocean-related
tourism and recreation threatened by pollution and sprawl.

In response, Governor McGreevey directed Commissioner Campbell to
consult with representatives of commercial and recreational fisheries,
community and environmental organizations, the business community, and
other constituencies and develop recommendations responding to the
report. The attached paper provides information on the proposed
recommendations.

The Department is asking for the public's thoughts on these proposed
measures and is also seeking the public's suggestions for how the
Department might better protect New Jersey's coastal areas and ocean
waters.

The Department will host two public meetings to gather input from
members of the public. The meetings are scheduled as follows:

Monday, April 19, 2004 at 10:30 am

Co-hosts: U.S. Senator Jon Corzine, U.S. Representative Frank LoBiondo
and DEP Commissioner Bradley Campbell

Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Performing Arts Center, College Drive, Pomona, NJ

Monday, April 26, 2004 at 7:00 pm

Co-hosts: U.S. Representative Frank Pallone and DEP Commissioner
Bradley Campbell

Monmouth University
Wilson Auditorium, Norwood Avenue, West Long Branch, NJ

If you plan on attending, please RSVP to Anne Marie Hoagland at
609-633-2201.

Written comments may also be sent to:
Ruth Ehinger
Coastal Program Manager
NJ Department of Environmental Protection
P.O. Box 418
Trenton, NJ 08625-0418

The attachment follows:

Coastal and Ocean Initiatives for Public Comment
and Public Meetings


BACKGROUND/INTRODUCTION

Today's laws to protect New Jersey's coastal areas have developed
over many decades. Governor McGreevey is committed to building on these
laws to enhance our coastal and ocean resources and is looking for
public input on how we can best achieve this goal.

Initially, laws such as New Jersey's Waterfront Development Law were
geared toward commerce and navigation. The passage of the Wetlands Act
of 1970 afforded protection to tidal marshes. In 1972, a national
program to manage coastal areas was established with passage of the
Coastal Zone Management Act. The following year New Jersey's Coastal
Area Facility Review Act was enacted and broadened protection of coastal
area resources. New Jersey's coastal management program was
established in 1978.

Notwithstanding these efforts to protect our coastal areas, there is
growing national concern and accumulating evidence that the oceans are
at risk from nonpoint and point source pollution, climate change,
overfishing and the effects of coastal development.

This concern lead to the creation of the Pew Oceans Commission in 2000.
In June 2003, the Pew Oceans Commission released its report to the
nation on the state of America's living oceans. The Commission
concluded that America's oceans are in crisis, with ocean-related
tourism and recreation threatened by pollution and sprawl. The report
highlighted the adverse effects of coastal development and sprawl on
coastal habitats and water quality. The report identified the root
cause as a failure in both perspective and governance. Finally, the
report stressed the need to consider the complex interactions of marine
ecosystems, the need to maintain the diversity of those systems, and the
need to change our perspective by treating the oceans as a public trust
and protecting the integrity of the ocean ecosystem. In response,
Governor McGreevey directed Commissioner Campbell to consult with
representatives of commercial and recreational fisheries, community and
environmental organizations, the business community, and other
constituencies and develop recommendations responding to the report.

The Oceans Act of 2000 mandated the creation of the U.S. Commission on
Ocean Policy, authorized by Congress, and comprised of members appointed
by the President. The U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy is charged with
making findings and developing recommendations to the President and
Congress for a coordinated and comprehensive national ocean policy. The
new policy will address a broad range of issues, ranging from the
stewardship of marine resources and pollution prevention to enhancing
and supporting marine science, commerce and transportation. The
Commission's Preliminary Report will be released for review and
comment by the nation's governors and other interested stakeholders on
April 20, 2004.

In response to the Pew Oceans Commission report and in anticipation of
the report of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy, the New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection has taken the opportunity to
consider actions that would strengthen stewardship of our coast and the
sustainability of our ocean. The measures being considered recognize
the ecological, economic, and recreational value of New Jersey's
marine and coastal resources, and are designed to further the goal of
healthy coastal and ocean ecosystems, as well as foster the public trust
regarding tidal waters administered by government for the benefit of all
citizens. The Department is asking for the public's thoughts on
these proposed measures and is also seeking the public's suggestions
for how the Department might better protect New Jersey's coastal areas
and ocean waters. Possible measures include changes to regulations,
development and implementation of plans to manage coastal and ocean
resources, funding sources for existing programs, or legislative
initiatives. In addition, the public input will help inform the
Governor's comments on the Ocean Commission's Preliminary Report.
The Governor's comments are due on May 21, 2004.

The Department will host two public meetings to gather input from
members of the public. The meetings are scheduled as follows:

Morning Meeting
Co-hosts: U.S. Senator Jon Corzine, U.S. Representative Frank LoBiondo
and DEP Commissioner Bradley Campbell
Monday, April 19, 2004 at 10:30 am
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Performing Arts Center
College Drive
Pomona, NJ

Evening Meeting
Co-hosts: U.S. Representative Frank Pallone and DEP Commissioner
Bradley Campbell
Monday, April 26, 2004 at 7:00 pm
Monmouth University
Wilson Auditorium
Norwood Avenue
West Long Branch, NJ

If you plan on attending, please RSVP to Anne Marie Hoagland at
609-633-2201.

Written comments may also be sent to:
Ruth Ehinger
Coastal Program Manager
NJ Department of Environmental Protection
P.O. Box 418
Trenton, NJ 08625-0418
OPTIONS FOR
COASTAL AND OCEAN PROTECTIONS

COASTAL HABITAT
Incorporate biodiversity considerations into long-term shore protection
planning, including protection, enhancement, and creation of habitat for
beach nesting birds, migratory shorebirds, horseshoe crabs, and
long-legged wading birds.

Establish new Coastal Sanctuaries Program to provide interconnected
areas of protected coastal habitat, coastal open space and natural areas
for public recreation and conservation, beginning with the Delaware Bay
and the waters and wetlands associated with Hereford Inlet and Great
Bay. Increase Green Acres Program (State Land Acquisition) funding
priority for the acquisition of lands that serve to create new, or
enhance existing Coastal Sanctuary areas.

Design and strengthen protection of high value coastal aquatic habitat
areas that are used by marine finfish and shellfish populations as
spawning and nursery areas. Special management options could then be
developed for these areas once clear objectives are identified and a
program is established to measure accomplishments, with appropriate
public and user group input.
Expand brownfield reimbursements to brownfield redevelopment that
includes a habitat restoration component.

Establish a long- term monitoring program for the horseshoe crab
population as a key species of the Delaware Bay ecosystem.

Address the role of fishing gear interactions and bycatch in population
declines of marine birds, turtles and mammals and to develop solutions
that minimize any negative impact on the commercial fishing industry.

Increase Green Acres Program funding to municipalities, counties, and
nonprofit land conservancies for the development of facilities that
promote wildlife viewing and other ecotourism opportunities. Facilities
might include boardwalks, platforms, bird blinds, canoe/kayak launch
areas, signage, etc.

COASTAL WATER QUALITY

Establish a challenge grant program to accelerate coastal stormwater
management and combined sewer overflow (CSO) compliance measures.
Implement measures to improve the quality of water discharged to the
ocean from Wreck Pond to reduce related beach closures. These measures
could include dredging the pond and its immediate tributaries,
installing stormwater controls for discharges to the pond to reduce
sediment and bacterial loadings, restoring habitat, and extending the
ocean outfall pipe. Develop a systematic approach for restoring and
managing additional coastal lakes that discharge into the Atlantic Ocean
and prioritize implementation based on severity of impairment to
recreational use.

In cooperation with the Office of Maritime Resources, develop regional
plans for dredged material management in the Raritan and Sandy Hook Bays
and the Atlantic coastal basin, with an emphasis on beneficial use.

Accommodate navigational dredging needs at private marinas and
federal/state navigational channels, with the goal of identifying
capacity to accept 500,000 cubic yards of dredged material by 2006.

Support the federal proposal for development of a coastal ocean
observing system to provide coordinated collection and analysis of
remote sensing data, automated sensor data and routine monitoring data
for more effective measurement of the health of New Jersey's ocean
waters.

Expand real-time water quality monitoring into Barnegat Bay in
cooperation with the New Jersey Water Monitoring Coordinating Council
Implement a Clean Marina Program that encourages marinas to adopt
voluntary measures to reduce marina-related pollution and contribute to
improving water quality.

Identify sanitary systems likely to fail and require remedial action to
prevent release of untreated sewage into coastal waters. The
determination would first focus on the systems of the City of Long
Branch, Ocean Township, and systems in the coverage areas of South
Monmouth Regional Sewerage Authorities, and Two Rivers Water Reclamation
Authority.

Reduce non-point source pollution to coastal waters by implementing the
new Municipal Storm Water Program. Governor McGreevey has already made
available $6 million in grants to assist compliance with the new
program, and has proposed an additional $6 million for this purpose in
the upcoming fiscal year. The State is also working towards making $30
million in challenge grants available for projects that are necessary to
achieve compliance with the new stormwater requirements.

Reduce the use of polluting materials, such as treated woods, in the
construction of docks and bulkheads in coastal waterways.

COASTAL DEVELOPMENT AND PUBLIC ACCESS

Revise the Coastal Zone Management and Water Quality Management rules
to concentrate development and reduce sprawl development in coastal
areas.

In conjunction with the Board of Public Utilities, develop standards
for offshore energy infrastructure, including wind turbines, which may
impact aspects of the marine and coastal environment, including avian
species, scenic resources, and public uses.

Strengthen New Jersey's role in managing development and use of the
ocean in federal waters and New Jersey's ability to review federal
projects and federally permitted projects such as submerged cables and
offshore wind turbines that may affect the State's coastal areas.
Review additional federal actions, including activities in interstate
waters such as the Hudson River and Delaware River and Bay, to ensure
that the state's coastal resources and uses are not adversely
affected.

Expand public's access to New Jersey's coastal waters for active
and passive recreation.

MARINE FISHERIES AND SHELLFISHERIES

Investigate the cause of the decline in surf clam stocks during the
past three years off the New Jersey coast.

Reduce the construction of new docks in shellfish waters.

Protect additional sensitive shellfish beds by classifying certain
surface water bodies as Category 1 waters, beginning with the
exceptional shellfish waters of the Great Egg Harbor River, Great Egg
Harbor Bay, and Maurice River.
Identify and address nonpoint sources of water pollution that adversely
affect shellfish resources and threaten public health through
consumption of contaminated shellfish, beginning with Sandy Hook Bay and
the Navesink River.

Enhance an additional 500 acres of oyster resources for their
ecological and economic benefits and work to secure federal funds to
expand efforts to rehabilitate the oyster resources within the Delaware
Estuary.

Initiate and assist in community-based hard clam and oyster restoration
projects in Atlantic Coast estuaries at locations where these resources
have declined. Drawing upon the Shellfish Habitat Mitigation Fund
monies designated for this purpose, the Department has a goal of
restoring 50-100 acres of hard clam and oyster habitat this year.

Institute licensing for commercial landings of fish to provide
dedicated funding for enforcement and systematic implementation of a
comprehensive system for collecting and trading of landing statistics.

Designate locations for environmentally sound aquaculture, with
consideration of the competing interests of various user groups. Develop
policies to facilitate expansion of shellfish aquaculture in New Jersey.
The Department anticipates the sampling and identification of 1000
acres of potential aquaculture locations in FY '05 to add to the
600-700 acres identified in FY '04.

Strengthen protection of fish and shellfish resources and maintenance
of commercial and recreational fishing, using updated mapping of ocean
waters that support significant recreational or commercial fishing.

Accelerate monitoring of toxic pollutants in crustaceans and fish
tissue, make the resulting data available to the public, and provide a
public process for analyzing the data.

Provide fish consumption advisories for shared waters that are
consistent between New Jersey and New York, and between New Jersey and
Pennsylvania. This effort will build on the success in issuing
consistent fish consumption advisories, in New Jersey and Delaware, for
the shared waters of the Delaware estuary, including the Delaware River
downstream of the Pennsylvania border and Delaware Bay. The benefits
for establishing consistent advisories in New Jersey's shared waters
include a more effective and concise public message, coordinated state
outreach efforts, increased public comprehension, and most importantly
increased protection of public health from the bioaccumulative
contaminants found in elevated levels in some local fish species.

SHARING OF COASTAL DATA

Create a publicly accessible database for sediment analysis information
generated from dredging projects in conjunction with efforts currently
being implemented by the Office of Maritime Resources, New Jersey
Department of Transportation.

Expand the Department's real-time water quality monitoring network to
provide greater coverage of the State's coastal waters to the public
through Internet access.

Provide information on public access locations to beaches and tidal
waters and associated amenities throughout the coastal area.

STATE LEGISLATION

Prohibit offshore energy exploration and development of offshore energy
facilities that would have an adverse affect on fish or marine life or
water quality.

Expand the jurisdiction of the Coastal Area Facility Review Act in
particularly sensitive areas.

Authorize the Environmental Infrastructure Trust to make loans
available prior to the end of a funding cycle for urgent or emergency
repairs needed to prevent sewer line failures.

Revise the shellfish statutes (Title 50) to allow aquaculture leases
for areas along the Delaware bayshore in the vicinity of Pierce's Point,
in response to changes in both the status of natural oyster beds in this
area and in fishery practices and to enhance the Department's efforts to
foster environmentally-sound aquaculture in New Jersey.

FEDERAL LEGISLATION

Reauthorize the Coastal Zone Management Act and strengthen states role
in coastal zone management.

Increase funding to the state coastal management programs, for
developing regional and ecosystem-based coastal and ocean resource
management policies, implementation of Stormwater Phase II, for combined
sewer overflow remediation.

Provide sustained, dedicated funding to the Coastal and Estuarine Land
Conservation Program and enable states to work in partnership with local
government and nongovernmental partners in land conservation.
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