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Ask Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is recognized as an authority on surf fishing for striped bass. He is the author of six books and hundreds of magazine articles. Frank is a member of the Outdoor Writers of America and lectures throughout the Northeast.

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  #1  
Old 10-17-2006, 05:10 PM
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Endorfin Endorfin is offline
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Default hunting related

Hi Frank,
Just a question I had about cleaning/gutting deer....where do you do this? If you live in a residential neighborhood, do you do the dirty work in the woods, and then bag it up at home?? Just curious; I don't think I want Mr Endorfin making a mess near our house!! Also, it's tough this time of year divideing time between fishing and hunting---it's when we go our separate ways! Hope you and Joyce have a good season.
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  #2  
Old 10-18-2006, 08:38 AM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Gutting is done right where the deer is shot. It removes about 1/3 the live weight. We have always marveled at how fast a gut pile disintegrates. For one thing the 30 feet of intestines is loaded with ground nuts/mast and the birds party with it so that it is cleaned up withing two days. The remaining parts go to a carnevore luau -- mink, raccoon, crows,weasel, fox, coyote. It is a stain after that. Home, you are stuck with the head and cape, some bones. Take them all back to the woods and the chippies get their calcium.

Yes, the collision between hunting and the migration is an age old problem. I lean toward hunting because tht is what my wife, Joyce, prefers. And the eating in venison is way better than the eating in bass and blues. Is that what dieticians mean when they say a "balanced diet"? Bass, blues, venison?
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  #3  
Old 10-18-2006, 10:44 AM
buck1173 buck1173 is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Daignault
Is that what dieticians mean when they say a "balanced diet"? Bass, blues, venison?
I dunno, but it sure is organic.

btw Frank, do you ever eat the liver, kidneys, etc? deer I mean.
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  #4  
Old 10-18-2006, 02:38 PM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Yes, all the time, with onions. The hearts and kidneys are milder. They are saying only eat the livers of young animals. I used to make pate with all livers but I got away from that. (Going to be around a lot because Joyce and I have a sexualy transmitted desease -- whooping caugh.)
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Old 10-18-2006, 07:09 PM
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Endorfin Endorfin is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Do you really? (have whooping cough, that is?)
I asked about the deer on the spur of the moment when I found "someone" in the garage with knives. But turns out it was as you said. (I'm a hypocrite---love cooking and eating it, but just don't want to know about the killing) I was worried about critters coming around because of it.
But I would like some more recipes!
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  #6  
Old 10-19-2006, 11:48 AM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Yes, we do both have whooping caugh. We are starting our third week of hacking, we sleep like 12 hours a day. The culture results came in this AM. And we did start taking the Z-Pack, this is third day, fourth pill. We lost a lot of turkey hunting and fishing but we are getting slightly better each day.

Don't have guilt about not wanting to kill. It is natural to feel that way. It takes a lot of mind control to make the transition unless you grew up with it. Putting up many recipes is a huge project and I don't know if it might offend striper fishers who are not here for that. Burger is the best venison use; at least half of our deer meat is burgerized and we do all the things you might do with beef we do with venison:
American Chop Suey
Venus DiMIlo soup
Meatballs (Individually frozen Product -- IFP)
Dynamites
Chilli
Cheezeburgers
Meatloaf
Stew
The steaks are grilled on the gas grill just like beef -- black outside, red center.

We don't do roasts or chops. Rather, we clean them as "straps" to avoid bone chips. If it ain't steak its burger. Front legs are burger and all trimmings off of the body, anything red, is burger.
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Old 10-19-2006, 02:22 PM
buck1173 buck1173 is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

My gosh Frank, hope you and Joyce kick this.

endorfin, I do my own butchering when i can get the time, and I get a little more gourmet... if I get a nice yearling doe, I'll do a crown rack as the tenderloins are usually not much bigger than a kielbasa anyhow... my favorite method is to french it, encrust the rack in a mustard & crushed pignoli & pistachio then roast like a rack of lamb.

With steaks, roasts & chops, I typically rely on my fav marinade: soy sauce, fresh grated ginger, a healthy dose of canola oil, a goodly amount of honey or brown sugar, fresh cracked pepper, depending on the amt of meat quarter 2-4 small yellow onions (yellow cause they're strong) and halve several garlic sections. Put everything in a ziplock w/the meat and squish it up real good so everything is incorporated. Let the flavors meld for at least 6hrs but no more than 18-24 in the fridge, then pan sear & roast or grill. This marinade takes all of 10 min and yeilds a great steak or roast that doesn't dry out easily, doesn't kill the natural flavor of the venison and also creates a nice caramelized coating when cooked. Brussell sprouts, or braised carrots or turnips & wild rice served along side and a great bottle of burgundy or bougalis makes a meal my friends relish.

with everything else, I'll either grind and make meatballs or chilli, etc. Make sure to add a significant portion of ground pork, etc, for fat or you'll end up with hockeypucks.

finally, with the lesser cuts and the ground I didn't get around to, I send the meat to a great guy in PA that does summer sausage and a great lebannon style bologna with venison. If you want a name or # I'll be happy to pass it along.

enjoy!
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  #8  
Old 10-19-2006, 04:21 PM
TonyT TonyT is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Leave the guts in the woods. As Frank says that's a lot of extra weight to carry out of the woods and the other animals clean it up real quick anyway. Bring a couple of ziplocks with you to save the heart/liver.

After butchering I stake out the bones in front of my gamewatcher camera, got some great pics of bobcat, fisher, hawk, raccoons, coyotes, skunks, etc.............the bobcat laid claim to things and seemed to chase everything else away, he was a big one even the coyotes won't mess with him. Attached pics are from right behind my house!

Salt the hide down with non-iodized salt, fold together skin side to skin side then freeze until you have time to scrape/tan it. Will keep like this for over a year, I'm waiting to get a couple more this year and do them all at once.

Whoops site won't let me download the pics files too large, anyone know how to compress them?
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  #9  
Old 10-19-2006, 04:33 PM
buck1173 buck1173 is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyT
After butchering I stake out the bones in front of my gamewatcher camera, got some great pics of bobcat, fisher, hawk, raccoons, coyotes, skunks, etc.............
awesome idea!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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  #10  
Old 10-19-2006, 05:05 PM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Forgot to mention sausage in my list. For fat I add 1/3 store sausage of a flavor I like then salt quite heavily and add a quarter of a t-spoon of coriender and a quarter of ground fennel, a quarter of chili powder. Mix it all up in a blender/food processer. 2/3 pound ground venison and 1/3 store sausage and all the powders.
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  #11  
Old 10-20-2006, 02:06 AM
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Endorfin Endorfin is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

Frank, I'm glad those "rules" about being off topic on a thread didn't make it, or I'd be in violation. Hope I haven't offended the fishermen. Hope you and Joyce are feeling better since starting the antibiotic. 3 weeks of coughing (whooping!)hurts in places you didn't know you had! (And not to mention it'd be pretty noisey in the woods.)
Definately going to try the sausage. And I will consult "my butcher" about the crown rack--Buck, may ask you some follow up questions on that one.
Garlic, soy, honey and ginger is the best meat marinade ever! I've got some cooking to do.
Wish I knew about compressing the pics---would love to see them.
.
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  #12  
Old 10-20-2006, 03:17 PM
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Default Re: hunting related

An important thing to remember is to treat the venison like beef in the sense that whatever you enjoy beefwise, you can also do with venison. Keeping in mind that chefs say, "not responsible for meat ordered well done", so too it is with venison. But I think a lot of people fear deer meat and cook the tar out of it. A thing I also do is cook extra on the grill and put it away for sandwiches. Joyce slices it it thin (1/4") and puts it in sandwiches. Lightly cooked the "steaks", sliced thin, are the color of ham. Sandwiches are important during hunting time for woods food. Though she gives me the dickens for eating all mine before it is light. Most know, but just to be thorough, all deer fat is awful and not edible so that has to be trimmed away. Also, when cooking, remember to use Montreal seasoning.

We start deer with firearms a week from tomorrow. I might have to cough in my grunt tube.
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  #13  
Old 10-20-2006, 08:41 PM
Gene from Norris Gene from Norris is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

What's Montreal seasoning?
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  #14  
Old 10-20-2006, 09:04 PM
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Default Re: hunting related

In the spice section at the grocery--think McCormick makes it?
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  #15  
Old 10-25-2006, 09:57 AM
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Frank Daignault Frank Daignault is offline
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Default Re: hunting related

It might be because it is what I want to think but it seems to me that deer have begun pre-rut activity and moving more. Yesterday a doe was hit at 2:00 PM in front of Day-Kimbal in Putnam, CT. This AM we had a spike-horn eating our lawn 20 feet from the house. I spent a lot of money nurturing that grass with expensive treatments. Do I have the right to protect my property?
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