StriperSurf Forums

StriperSurf Forums (http://stripersurf.com/forums/index.php)
-   Ask Frank Daignault (http://stripersurf.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=13)
-   -   How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years? (http://stripersurf.com/forums/showthread.php?t=540892)

John_P 07-14-2017 10:23 AM

How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
This is an interesting one. I do know that some articles are praised by the old school but younger guys just don't get it

There's a suggestion that today's reader simply wants the exact lure, and spot, add a hero shot, and don't bother him with s story or narrative. Ok I'm being a bit harsh but only to make a point.

But we can't deny social media has completely changed the press as we know it

What do you think?

Francis Daignault 07-14-2017 11:26 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
First of all, I want to say that outdoor writing is one of the cleanest forms of press in our society. Reason for this is that the outdoors is less political and serves a willing readership. Outdoor writers are providing a rather innocuous, yet valuable service to its readers -- how to fish/hunt, where to fish/hunt. Outdoor press is in a cleaner business than run-of-the-mill print media.

Having been serving outdoor readers since 1968, I believe readers needs and writers providing of such needs has changed very little. Today's sportsmen want the same things their fathers wanted and those providing that service are meeting it. If anything, the quality of that service has improved.

I have plans to say much more on this wildly cogent thread, John, but I wanted to open it up for the protocols. Thanks for putting this up. It is a favorite subject of mine and will keep me reflecting on this for days because it has a lot of angles that need treatment. (Be back a little later.)

John_P 07-14-2017 11:56 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Thanks for quick response

One related topic is

How do you know what is connecting with readers?

I know you've got book sales, but anything else?

I know you've said Hotspots has sold more books, but my own favorite by far is 20 Years

Francis Daignault 07-14-2017 02:14 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
My beginning was with surfcasting and I have been a surf writer since I started with SWS. Now I am primarily a surf writer, though I have done other things like shooting and hunting on a smaller scale. My main gigs are here and SW magazines who cover boats and surf. My books sales are not as lucrative any more because I stopped doing seminars and royalties are dismal because the world has largely bought my eight titles. Hot Spots did okay but the real market stormer was Stripe Surf. Twenty Years did not sell a million copies but I made out moneywise when I took over publishing it. The northeast is striper country and I was really the first; there had been other shore striper books a million years ago but nothing was available during my writing years so I kind of got in during a literary striper void, lucky. Now there are so many doing it that for me it kind of stinks. I am not going to work all year for a lousy $10,000. Also, I was killed by the press over the dog thing 15 years ago causing the loss of a couple of good gigs -- a Cape publication and Mass Bass. I despised the press long before Donald Trump. Investments took up the slack of when I had been writing seriously. Lets get back on track.

In 1989 the teacher's retirement offered an early out deal because experienced teachers were too expensive. The pension was not quite liveable but I had a fat IRA, a working wife, :uhoh: and my writing, seminars and book sales matched the tiny pension. I fished, hunted, wrote while enjoying the life of a half-fast rock star. A dream for which I was matching my teaching salary. (Some of the Internet trolls would call my life style greedy.) After health, life is about money. And love. And stripers. And shooting well.

There can be a lot of stones in the road so, like Marines, you have to adapt/improvise.
Guys were killing each other on the Cape. Rangers were busting chops. Market fishing stripers got outlawed and Mister Smarty was thrown to the wolves. I always did what I thought I had to do even putting a round down a dog's throat, I usually did the right thing. Right now I have two editors who treat me like gold.

Outdoor writing is clean because it does not require the writer to screw anybody to create copy. I mean that when you tell a reader how to put a worm on a hook, is the worm going to bitch? Of course if reporters were not so desperate they could check their sources, could stop spinning stories they stooled from some other source who was first to spin it. If you have come to the conclusion that I hate those (p)ricks, I have satisfied my intent.

Connecting with readers? That's easy. I gave my life to striper fishing from shore and learned during that time the charm that I know makes it exciting. All I do is remind him of what he already knows. If he does not yet know, its my job to get him there and that is easy too.

RobS 07-16-2017 06:37 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
I have appreciated Frank and a small number of other outdoor, specifically fishing, writers since I started fishing avidly (with passion) relatively late in life.... mid-40s.

As such, however, I'm now in the older demographic and see shifts in general with the younger generation... those who are coming of age in the "social media" era.

I think publications like Surfcaster's Journal, however, are hitting the nail on the head with new online multimedia format. They are trying out the combined power of blogging, youtube, with a fairly readable digital format that I haven't seen others trying to the same extent. Combine that with first rate authors (hint: Mr. Smarty graces the "pages" from time to time) that span the generations and it's a home run, from my perspective.

I really wonder, however, if it's possible to get a bead on what the younger audience wants... or more to the point, how they will feel most comfortable consuming the outdoor writing. It's not so much the content that will change, since hunting and fishing at their basic core won't change, but how the readers will access and consume that content, IMO.

Francis Daignault 07-16-2017 03:28 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Digital photography has made photos better than back when we used to pay for film, developing. Those days every exposure you snapped cost money and you could spend big bucks for a bad trip to the darkroom. Now, people take a bunch of good pictures that have no related cost, Our Migauel member takes marvelous photos that cost him nothing. My early years a lot of the magazines used to publish some real crap. Joe Brooks in a dress shirt and tie with a grip and grin of a dead fish. When I started I could see nobody would take pictures at night surfcasting. I sold SWS a cover photo of a guy at night when it never had been done. Being on the inside if the quality of support photography made articles better, than readers had to experience a better read.
Old time editors talked to writers where today you make a submission and never hear back. I queried a current SWS editor who never heard of me and did not even show me the courtesy of a refusal. Just didn't answer. I have one out with an editor now for a year. No response! Editors today, not all mind you, don't know that it is unethical to let a writer rot. So while the product is better today, the editor/writer ethic is functioning without well followed protocols. I have two editors that I love, but I have a few that won't even show me the courtesy of a rejection. And of course I have the one who kicked me out 16 years ago.

John_P 07-16-2017 05:32 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429607)
Digital photography has made photos better than back when we used to pay for film, developing. Those days every exposure you snapped cost money and you could spend big bucks for a bad trip to the darkroom. Now, people take a bunch of good pictures that have no related cost, Our Migauel member takes marvelous photos that cost him nothing. My early years a lot of the magazines used to publish some real crap. Joe Brooks in a dress shirt and tie with a grip and grin of a dead fish. When I started I could see nobody would take pictures at night surfcasting. I sold SWS a cover photo of a guy at night when it never had been done. Being on the inside if the quality of support photography made articles better, than readers had to experience a better read.
Old time editors talked to writers where today you make a submission and never hear back. I queried a current SWS editor who never heard of me and did not even show me the courtesy of a refusal. Just didn't answer. I have one out with an editor now for a year. No response! Editors today, not all mind you, don't know that it is unethical to let a writer rot. So while the product is better today, the editor/writer ethic is functioning without well followed protocols. I have two editors that I love, but I have a few that won't even show me the courtesy of a rejection. And of course I have the one who kicked me out 16 years ago.

I suspect some editors just don't have the time. Maybe they are worried about getting the bills paid and pleasing advertisers.

It getting back to the point, I just don't know if readers have changed. Some mags I'll
Read a few paragraphs and shrug my shoulders like I guess readers like the tired cliches

HookI 07-17-2017 08:54 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
The big change is readers don't have time to read .
Went to the local recycling depot last month and this guy had a pick-up truck filled with used library conditioned books ready for the drop off . " Books take up too much space " ??

Francis Daignault 07-17-2017 11:41 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
There is nothing like a good book. My wife reads constantly and has done so all her life. I read less but just finished Finest Hour and last week, another CG thriller. People with "no time for reading" deprive themselves. I do a lot of reading when deer hunting while on stand. If you have to urge reading, you are already too late. :dunno:

Francis Daignault 07-18-2017 04:01 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
It is hard to answer the actual change in readers. But the product they are given to read is better -- photography, writer language skills, internal color is more affordable for publishers. When I started writing the publication's inside pages were all black and white. Computer writing changed the whole folderal of writers hitting the wrong key. Never thought "white-out" would someday go out of style! :dunno:

John_P 07-19-2017 07:09 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Yes, and there's more information available for free : )

Francis Daignault 07-19-2017 11:12 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
What seems to be very popular news are the fishing reports like those offered in The Fisherman When reader surveys are conducted the fishing reports lead. Also, my annual fifties count is wildly popular.

I also don't think that outdoor publications contain much fake news like your morning paper. This week, after years of telling readers sugar was bad for them, they came out this week saying sugar substatute is bad.

RobS 07-19-2017 11:48 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
That's not fake news, Frank. But the nuances are similar to those w.r.t. "pink slime"
and with similar consequences.

That is, the "pink slime" you see coming off your fresh frozen venison burger is *not* the same as the "piink slime" used to manufacture processed meats.

But I digress.

Pertinent to the thread, subtleties are often lost on the press and many, if not most, readers.

John_P 07-19-2017 02:14 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429650)
What seems to be very popular news are the fishing reports like those offered in The Fisherman When reader surveys are conducted the fishing reports lead. Also, my annual fifties count is wildly popular.

I also don't think that outdoor publications contain much fake news like your morning paper. This week, after years of telling readers sugar was bad for them, they came out this week saying sugar substatute is bad.

For what it's worth I subscribe to a wide variety of fishing publications I might not agree with an article or even an editorial view, but it's always fun to read who is saying what.

I have a re-discovered love for the fishing reports.

In my neck of the woods I know many of the people being cited and I know what they are catching and I can also count the dead racks in the dumpster

The reports are a specific reflection of reality whereas there articles largely deal with what might be. And once in a while I'll be impressed if a writer will venture a guess as to why

While I used to curse the inflated reports, now I just apply a discount factor to what was reported to get me in the ballpark of what really happened. The locations are fun because I'll know often some people were and it's fun to hear them say where they were. That's ok, I'd never say the truth either.

Might be just my view but years ago it seemed readers more often believed what was written. Or maybe just seemed that way. Now I hear more from readers who openly joke about crazy or inflated fishing reports

Francis Daignault 07-19-2017 03:30 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
There is no question but that readers are experiencing a decline in trust. I consume every word in a fishing publication but laugh at my Boston Globe. We all learn that some information is agendarized . I think today's reader, the subject of this thread by the way, is more sophisticated than their grandfathers.

John_P 07-20-2017 03:10 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Back to the original topic, my guess is that good writing no longer stands on its own. Not sure if it ever really did but I remember reading articles or essays with no photos.

Seems to me readrs want more and better pictures, and even video if that's feasible

Some magazine editors ( not sure about fishing) ask their contributors to submit blogs etc
I'm guessing this is all coming from what today's readers want?

Francis Daignault 07-20-2017 03:54 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Everything is better today -- pictures, editing, contributions, communications with writers. Advertising is better done; I even know anglers who buy to read the advertising .... believe it or not. Publications are usually more sophisticated. Only thing is that in the old days, I never was left out of a reply when I had an article idea. Today, no response is common.

John_P 07-20-2017 10:12 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429669)
Everything is better today -- pictures, editing, contributions, communications with writers. Advertising is better done; I even know anglers who buy to read the advertising .... believe it or not. Publications are usually more sophisticated. Only thing is that in the old days, I never was left out of a reply when I had an article idea. Today, no response is common.

Yes I agree with all of it but I wouldn't agree the writing is better. Maybe I'm wanting something that, with selective memory, seemed better than it really was.

I pick up a slick publication that cost me a bundle, I'll read two paragraphs and think 'geez' they couldn't edit out at least a couple of the tired cliches, or re-phrase it to show at least a little creativity?'

'Salt in his blood'
'Earned their stripes'
'Running on fumes'
'Seasoned pro'

But nice pictures Really nice.

Francis Daignault 07-21-2017 11:47 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
John, nothing is perfect. People today are more educated so your chance of seeing good literature in print is higher now than the old days. There are a lot of niche publications -- racing forms, shooting publications that teach wing shooting, even quail hunting. My late father subscribed to The American Small Stock Farmer and he consumed every page, every word. I know people here and elsewhere see mags as same old, same old. That was always the case. When I was a student in high school, I used to keep a copy of Outdoor Life and Field and Stream in my notebook which I read during lectures and study hall. It was more entertaining, for me at least, than Huck Finn.

John_P 07-21-2017 02:17 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429679)
John, nothing is perfect. People today are more educated so your chance of seeing good literature in print is higher now than the old days. There are a lot of niche publications -- racing forms, shooting publications that teach wing shooting, even quail hunting. My late father subscribed to The American Small Stock Farmer and he consumed every page, every word. I know people here and elsewhere see mags as same old, same old. That was always the case. When I was a student in high school, I used to keep a copy of Outdoor Life and Field and Stream in my notebook which I read during lectures and study hall. It was more entertaining, for me at least, than Huck Finn.

I couldn't afford to buy all the magazines but the school library had them... there were about 8 of us who were really interested in fishing and we would race each other to the library at recess to get ahold of the latest issues of Sports Afield, Field and Stream or Outdoor Life. February and March were the longest months of the year as we read up and waited for trout season.

My god, today's kids have access to publications plus blogs and chat boards

I think we read every article back then about 4-5 times. I doubt that happens today

Francis Daignault 07-22-2017 11:06 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
In school I had a bunch of similar buddies who read all the same magazines from the library. I remember Bob Saunders who died in a canoe accident guiding in Alaska. I recall Bob Lipka who lost a leg in the military and ran a tackle shop while fishing all his life. Both those guys became lifelong outdoorsmen who I would see in the field along the way. Outdoor reading had an influence on their lives.

John_P 07-26-2017 09:58 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429691)
In school I had a bunch of similar buddies who read all the same magazines from the library. I remember Bob Saunders who died in a canoe accident guiding in Alaska. I recall Bob Lipka who lost a leg in the military and ran a tackle shop while fishing all his life. Both those guys became lifelong outdoorsmen who I would see in the field along the way. Outdoor reading had an influence on their lives.

Yes same here. All those guys from my school still fish heavily today. I'll get pictures and snippets from social media all the time. We had our own informal 'club' where we would sit at the lunch table and talk about fishing. We would often talk about the articles we had read. Once in a while a non fisherman would ask to come fishing and often the lack of commitment or skill was fodder for some good laughs the following Monday.

As stated earlier, getting access to stories and instructional articles wasn't the best. We had limited outlets and there was no google !

Francis Daignault 07-27-2017 11:08 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Like you, I think all the outdoor magazines contributed an influential component to both our interest and results. As young people thursting to know more about fishing and hunting, the outdoor mags filled an important developmental niche in many of us. Even today I see adults, who started fishing or hunting late, and never subscribed to our outdoor media, have flaws in their angling development. Outdoor writers are teachers of fishing and of hunting.

I say this in contrast to the so called "fake news media" who tell lies about people under the protection of the first amendment and who seek to sway politics. Certainly, while both are "writers" there is a world of difference between bonefish in Belieze and falsely reporting a crime when there was no crime. We don't need President Trump to tell us what has gone on for years, though he happens to be correct.

Francis Daignault 07-28-2017 10:09 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
One change I have witnessed is that Salt Water Sportsman had taken shore fishing out of their editorial balance. I junior editor once told me that the add money justified dropping the surf. On the other hand, surfcasting has always been the seed stock of eventual transition to boats. The late editor, Frank Woolner, felt that way but he was overruled by the bean counters. I lost my gig there because of that; but then, when you write for 50 years, you lose a lot of gigs. :dunno:

John_P 07-29-2017 07:54 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Francis Daignault (Post 2429773)
One change I have witnessed is that Salt Water Sportsman had taken shore fishing out of their editorial balance. I junior editor once told me that the add money justified dropping the surf. On the other hand, surfcasting has always been the seed stock of eventual transition to boats. The late editor, Frank Woolner, felt that way but he was overruled by the bean counters. I lost my gig there because of that; but then, when you write for 50 years, you lose a lot of gigs. :dunno:

Regulator, Yellowfin, Contender, Simrad, Garmin, Furuno, Yamaha, Mercury, Westmarine, Grundens, Seatow, Yeti, Taco, Raymarine .....dominate the add space of many of these magazines. Then again surf guys have no problem digging deep for Van Staal, but much of the market supplying goods are niche regional and small outfit fabrication shops. Surf Guys spend big on custom rolled rods, custom belts, limited production lures, limited production surf bags, limited or highly customized beach vehicles.

SALMONMEISTER 07-29-2017 08:41 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by John_P (Post 2429786)
Regulator, Yellowfin, Contender, Simrad, Garmin, Furuno, Yamaha, Mercury, Westmarine, Grundens, Seatow, Yeti, Taco, Raymarine .....dominate the add space of many of these magazines. Then again surf guys have no problem digging deep for Van Staal, but much of the market supplying goods are niche regional and small outfit fabrication shops. Surf Guys spend big on custom rolled rods, custom belts, limited production lures, limited production surf bags, limited or highly customized beach vehicles.

The expensive surf stuff is very inexpensive compared to boat related items. A VanStaal reel is probably less expensive than the T top (basically an umbrella to house some electronics and provide shade) on most 25' center console boats. I noticed a couple years back that Saltwater Sportsman Magazine has a seminar series that comes to different areas. When you register for it, they give you a gift package that consists of some off shore fishing analysis, fuel treatment, and boat polish. Hey SWS? How 'bout a gift with some actual hooks in it?!

John_P 07-29-2017 11:19 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by SALMONMEISTER (Post 2429787)
The expensive surf stuff is very inexpensive compared to boat related items. A VanStaal reel is probably less expensive than the T top (basically an umbrella to house some electronics and provide shade) on most 25' center console boats. I noticed a couple years back that Saltwater Sportsman Magazine has a seminar series that comes to different areas. When you register for it, they give you a gift package that consists of some off shore fishing analysis, fuel treatment, and boat polish. Hey SWS? How 'bout a gift with some actual hooks in it?!

Yes, but surf is still a bit of a niche market.

I still get a kick out of going offshore and trolling like 12 rods, and some lures don't even have hooks. But it is big money. 2 Deisels at about 2000 rpm going 24 knots is like cha Ching cha Ching cha Ching

SALMONMEISTER 07-29-2017 11:55 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by John_P (Post 2429789)
Yes, but surf is still a bit of a niche market.

I still get a kick out of going offshore and trolling like 12 rods, and some lures don't even have hooks. But it is big money. 2 Deisels at about 2000 rpm going 24 knots is like cha Ching cha Ching cha Ching

Definitely a good niche market... I just meant that the differences in costs between boat and surf stuff is substantial.

Nice fish John! Is that a subliminal advertisement for "Yellowfin" boats? :hihi:

John_P 07-29-2017 02:58 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SALMONMEISTER (Post 2429791)
Definitely a good niche market... I just meant that the differences in costs between boat and surf stuff is substantial.

Nice fish John! Is that a subliminal advertisement for "Yellowfin" boats? :hihi:

Actually I have a Contender. I've never ridden a yellowfin yet. But see brand spanking new ones out there with 3 engines hanging off the back. I do find it quite interesting how sometimes the reputation of the boat plays into perceptions about the owner. I guess it's sort of like vehicles.

But getting back to the surf thing...what I can say with 100% unbiased honesty...the perception of a Surfcaster is extremely high among all class of boat people, and even those with fancy offshore boats. The perception is of a figure it out yourself guy who knows more about how wind and tide play into fish and bait movements, and of a guy who really knows his gear.

It's a lot easier to pay 1000 for an inshore charter or 2000 for an offshore charter and let the Captain find you fish, you reel them in and you can call yourself a good fisherman. Lol

Francis Daignault 07-30-2017 02:59 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
"It's a lot easier to pay 1000 for an inshore charter or 2000 for an offshore charter and let the Captain find you fish, you reel them in and you can call yourself a good fisherman."

Johnny grab that! :nervous:

Francis Daignault 07-31-2017 12:22 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
My wife is a reading machine who knocks off at least two titles per week. But she flat out refuses to read about fishing and hunting other than editing what I write. She is competent in the field but sometimes has these eureka moments which are too basic for someone of her ability. Two years ago she shot a buck that went to water and died. She was astonished that was predictable deer behavior, a thing most hunters know. But she has failed to keep herself informed and relies too heavily on me to keep her up to speed. People who do not avail themselves to outdoor media are less informed.

John_P 08-01-2017 03:17 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
I keep thinking a well written "fishing story" should have crossover mainstream appeal that even my wife would read

It almost happened with The Perfect Storm but she refused to read it because she said it would make her too upset

Then A Speck In th Sea just came out about a local fisherman who fell off a boat on its way offshore and nobody saw him go over

She meant to buy me an autographed copy but they signed it to her by mistake, so she bought two copies. She is also a book junkie and she loves this book

So maybe she'll dig into one of my fishing books next?

Francis Daignault 08-02-2017 12:04 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
There have been a rash of Coast Guard books lately -- The Guardian, Deadliest Sea, the one off Chatham, (forgot title) where CG goes out over Chatham Bar, aka Long Bar. Top thriller is Deadliest Sea, which they are bound to make a movie of.

John_P 08-02-2017 03:30 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
I wonder how much of that interest is created by Deadliest Catch and Wicked Tuna. Those TV shows are much more popular than I ever dreamed they'd be. People down these parts watch every episode and the cast are basically celebrities when every they visit town.

Francis Daignault 08-03-2017 06:41 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
I enjoy those shows but they do make some dumb mistakes which imply an inherent googanism. Dogs on deck getting in the way. No Polaroids while gaffing. They kind of give the impression that they have no clue.

HookI 08-03-2017 07:26 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Gloucester MA is a great town , one of my favorites. Only been up there a few years & fished the Bass Rocks . It's where the shows originated. We had a lot of fun drinking whiskey with the locals , my NYC accent and they're NE "BaStan" drawl . Had alot of laughs on each other .

Francis Daignault 08-03-2017 11:30 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
I had a speech professor who could tell where you came from by hearing just one of your sentences. Maine, Boston, NYC, Jersey the south -- all identifiable.

Francis Daignault 08-07-2017 11:45 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
There is a growing sentiment in print publications, say newspapers and magazines, that has the potential to spill over into outdoor publications. That sentiment is to distrust what people read. Look at Trumps "fake news" which he happens to be right about. I see a big difference between Outdoor Life and the Washington Post but I wonder if the man on the street sees that difference.

John_P 08-09-2017 12:55 PM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Yes I sort of agree but I also remember some articles or fishing reports that generated a lot of laughs on the beach. Some written to shamelessly plug a product or a fake or highly inflated fishing report, presumably to generate some extra traffic I'm not saying it happens all the time but most guys recognize this phenomenon in the outdoors columns
I've never read a negative product review

Francis Daignault 08-10-2017 11:17 AM

Re: How have Outdoor READERS changed over the last 20-30 years?
 
Yes, John, I agree with you. When people BS readers they are ruining their credability. Long run, the reason to be for all -- advertisers, publishers, readers -- all fall out of the loop. It goes back to my editorial, "Is It True".


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:35 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2016 StriperSurf.com, All Rights Reserved